Mayor Backs Casino Deal, Iowa Gaming Commission Votes No on the Proposal Anyway

Tracking the ups and downs of local cities in the US trying to get legal casino gambling has been a challenge, but well worth it. Unfortunately, in order to cover the good, we also have to cover the bad. You will quickly find that things aren’t the way they appear in the casino gambling world from a legislative point of view. Even though Mayor Ron Corbett of Cedar Rapids, IA pushed for the casino development (a $164 million dollar development), and the Iowa Gaming Commission didn’t see things in the same light.

Indeed, the 5-4 decision from the IGC was in favor of not allowing the $164 million dollar project to go forward. Their reasoning was simple: it would simply hurt the business of other casinos in the area, and could not be allowed to pass.

Mayor Ron Corbett of Cedar Rapids

This is a blow to the Cedar Rapids community, but it’s one that the community will take in stride.

The idea of the surrounding casinos crying foul might seem laughable, but it’s far from a joke. Waterloo, Dubuque, and Riverside have casino developments. Since those casinos were built in 2007, they have pulled gambling traffic away from Cedar Rapids. It seems unfortunate that now that there’s support for a casino in Cedar Rapids, the surrounding casinos feel that it’s going to take too much from their own casino holdings.

What else is on the line in this situation? Jobs, of course. Indeed, if you are already established in an area, you would naturally worry about the jobs on the line if conditions change. While it can be argued that casinos should work on being as competitive as possible, rather than just protecting their little mock-fiefdoms, the truth is that an area can ideally only support so much gambling.

Is that really the case though? Current sentiment in the country is that gambling is healthy for communities, as it provides yet another vehicle for tourism. If you think about it, that line of reasoning makes a lot of sense.

Unfortunately, state gaming commissions are more concerned about not upsetting the status quo than bringing in real progress. What do you think? Do you feel that Cedar Rapids could benefit from a casino, or would you rather the residents simply drive to Riverside or Waterloo for their gambling fun?

Hopefully these issues will highlight the biggest problem of all: how do you bring the openness of gambling to the local scene, while maintaining a high standard for quality, fairness, and regulation?

A Casino Near Churchill Downs – Mayor Thinks It’s Aces

Kentucky legislators are still debating the idea of gambling in their fair state, but one person is at least on board: the mayor of Louisville. Indeed, Greg Fischer seems to be on board with having gambling in Louisville. He just wants to make sure that it’s located in the right spot.

Churchill Downs Inc, the company behind the legendary racetrack, wants to be clear on their position as well: gambling would be better if it was done away from the racetrack. The Mayor seems to agree, and that’s a great thing.

This doesn’t mean that casino gambling has been legalized in the state of Kentucky. Some officials feel, that it’s never going to happen, but many others are optimistic. The current issue is that legislators need to vote on whether to let the people vote on it or not. In our opinion, the people need to have the right to vote on their future.

Gambling is a touchy issue, because many feel that if you want to gamble, there are other ways to do it. In fact, there are some places opening up online that are friendly to US players again. If states don’t begin to figure out the gambling problem, more online companies will step in to fill the space.

The idea that online gambling represents some sort of Wild Wild West is equally absurd. It’s not about that at all. In fact, all of your top casinos online are heavily regulated. This means that there are precise standards in place about how things should be. Fair gaming is one of the biggest concerns people have about a casino. They don’t mind losing money, but they do want to be sure that they’re going to do it without being ripped off.

These same considerations have to be in place in the real world. Legislators need to give the citizenry the right to control their destiny. Casinos bring in big state revenues, and they bring jobs to areas that would otherwise go without them. If you buy lottery tickets but are against casino gambling, you are holding a position that just doesn’t make much sense in 2014.

Thoughts? Do you think that Mayor Fischer should give up on casino dreams, or continue to think about Louisville’s future?